Tesla stock split

Thanks for trying to answer my question, but, if you read the conversation over the weekend, you’ll see that some of us have been trying to work out how that differs from selling or buying shares before the record date.

My sympathies goes to T212 staff, 193 posts in the topic and 300 of them are asking the same question :panda_face:

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Maybe they should give us a clear answer then

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Yes, I know it’s incoming, my point was that we’ve had conflicting information so far and that’s the reason why there have been so many questions on this thread about the same thing

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Below, I will shed light onto the upcoming stock splits & you can consider this information as the ultimate source of truth.

Scenario 1. (Row 1 in the attached table). Total quantity before split-WHOLE number (Non-Pie quantity + Pie quantity)

Your total quantity (non-Pie+Pie) is multiplied by the share ratio coefficient. The distribution of the total quantity between (non-Pie and Pie) after the split will be amended as follows:

  • Non- Pie quantity AFTER the split = (Non-Pie quantity BEFORE the split * Total quantity AFTER the split) / Total Quantity BEFORE split.

  • Pie quantity AFTER the split = (Pie quantity BEFORE the split * Total quantity AFTER the split) / Total Quantity BEFORE split.

Scenario 1.1 (Row 2 in the attached table) Total quantity before split whole number (Pie quantity) -

Your total quantity (Pie) is multiplied by the share ratio coefficient.

  • Pie quantity AFTER the split = (Pie quantity BEFORE the split * Total quantity AFTER the split)/Total Quantity BEFORE split.

Scenario 1.2 (Row 3 in the attached table) Total quantity before split whole number (Non-Pie quantity)

Your total quantity (Pie) is multiplied by the share ratio coefficient.

  • Non- Pie quantity AFTER the split = ( Pie-bucket quantity BEFORE the split * Total quantity AFTER the split) / Total Quantity BEFORE split.

Scenario 2. (Row 4 in the attached table) Total quantity before split-FRACTION number ( Non-Pie quantity + Pie quantity)

Your total quantity (non-Pie+Pie) is multiplied by the share ratio coefficient, the result is rounded to the nearest lower whole number. The remaining quantity will be sold at the last available price. The distribution of the total quantity between (non-Pie and Pie) after the split will be amended as follows:

- Non- Pie quantity AFTER the split = (Non- Pie quantity BEFORE the split * Total quantity AFTER the split) / Total Quantity BEFORE split.

- Pie quantity AFTER the split = (Pie quantity BEFORE the split * Total quantity AFTER the split) / Total Quantity BEFORE split.

Scenario 2.1. (Row 5 in the attached table) Total quantity before split-FRACTION number (Pie quantity)

Your total quantity (Pie) is multiplied by the share ratio coefficient, the result is rounded to the nearest lower whole number. The remaining quantity will be sold at the last available price.

  • Pie quantity AFTER the split = (Pie quantity BEFORE the split * Total quantity AFTER the split) / Total Quantity BEFORE split.

Scenario 2.2. (Row 6 in the attached table) Total quantity before split-FRACTION number (Non-Pie quantity)

Your total quantity (non-Pie) is multiplied by the share ratio coefficient, the result is rounded to the nearest lower whole number. The remaining quantity will be sold at the last available price.

  • Non- Pie quantity AFTER the split = (Non-Pie quantity BEFORE the split * Total quantity AFTER the split) / Total Quantity BEFORE split.

Scenario 3. (Row 7,8,9 in the attached table) Total quantity after the split < 1.

Your total quantity (non-Pie+Pie) is multiplied by the share ratio coefficient, the resulted quantity will be sold at the last available price.

Scenario 4. (Row 10,11,12 in the attached table) Total quantity before the split <1 and the resulted quantity after the split is >1

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I’m glad you changed “EVEN” to “WHOLE”! I was totally confused.

There are still references to “ODD” numbers.

It has been amended!

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Are there any differences at all between ISA, INVEST and CFD?

Can you confirm whether the “record date” is completely irrelevant to both Trading 212 and your investors?

By “last available price”, do you mean the initial post-split price, which will be one-fifth of the market closing price on 28/08/2020?

Based on this new information, here is my attempt to answer my own question for total Tesla shares specifically:

0.1 shares => 0.5 shares sold at post-split price
0.2 shares => 1 share
0.3 shares => 1 share + 0.5 shares sold at post-split price
1 share => 5 shares
1.2 shares => 6 shares
1.3 shares => 6 shares + 0.5 shares sold at post-split price

If that’s correct and you understand those examples, you should be able to perform the calculation for any other quantity of shares. In fact, now that we have confirmation that there’s no significance to having less than 1 whole, pre-split share, you only really need the 0.1 and 0.3 examples!

If some of the shares are in a pie, then the number of remaining whole, post-split shares (after the post-split fractional component is sold) are split between the pie and non-pie parts in exactly the same ratio as they were pre-split.

Is that a decent (and correct) summary?

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By last available price we mean the closing price at market close on 28/08/2020.

I don’t think you do. Your table shows the “Remaining (“Sold”) Quantity” as a post-split quantity (i.e. it’s been multiplied by 3) so you need to divide the price by 3 too.

By the way, I think you should’ve used a “stock split coefficient” of 5 (like Tesla) for your table in this topic. By using 3, you’re liable to cause more confusion.

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Or even simpler…

  1. Your total shares are multiplied by 5

  2. You retain any resulting whole shares and the fractional part is sold at the post-split price

  3. Your post-split whole shares are split between the pie and non-pie parts in the same ratio as pre-split

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I’m so confused reading all this. I don’t use pies or anything, just simple investing, kinda new.

I have 0.06 Tesla shares just now. If I invest some more to round this up to 0.2 then this will get converted to 1 share at the split and I will get to keep my share without having to sell and buy back in right?

Thanks.

You can’t be that confused because I believe you are 100% correct!

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Thanks this is a lot easier to understand than the table

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I’m still rather confused with all this… I’m just a rather new small investor and it’s the first time I have come across this stock-split.

I currently hold 0.1046339 shares in Tesla so would i still qualify for the stock split or not???

If I don’t then would it be better to sell my Tesla shares now before the stock split at the end of Aug so I can take the profit now rather than make a huge loss when the share price drops???

Please can someone advise me as I’m not too sure about this.

Thanks

Welcome to the forum @ZI786!

I believe you will end up with 0.5231695 shares being sold at the post-split price; this is equivalent to 0.1046339 shares being sold at the pre-split price (about $221/£167 at the current share price of $2,110 and exchange rate of 1.32). You therefore won’t technically lose anything from a value perspective, except your ownership of the fractional shares. Whether that’s a good or a bad thing will depend on whether the price goes up or down on Monday morning.

If you want to retain Tesla shares without having to worry about what happens to the price between Friday and Monday, you could purchase an additional 0.0953661 shares at a price of around $201/£152 to give you a round 0.2 shares, which will be split to 1 share.

I just tried to check this on the iPhone app and I can only specify the price to 5 decimal places. How did you end up with a fractional share to 7 decimal places? If you have the same issue then you’d need to round up to adding 0.09537 shares. In that case, you’ll end up with 0.2000039 pre-split shares, which will be split to 1.0000195 shares. I think the 0.0000195 shares will be sold at the post-split price, leaving you with a single Tesla share and about £0.0066329545454545, which may be rounded up to 1p if you’re lucky!

This is just my interpretation of what we’ve been told. There may be some subtle differences with regards to the number of decimal places and rounding. The key thing is that you get to a pre-split number of shares that, when it is multiplied by 5, is a whole number (or just above), i.e. those that end in .0, .2, .4, .6 and .8.

The worst-case scenarios are pre-split numbers of shares that end close to .19999, .39999, .59999, .79999 and .99999 because you will just miss out on a whole post-split share. Fortunately, it would cost very little to add additional fractional shares to get to .0, .2, .4, .6 and .8 or just above.

Conversely, pre-split numbers of shares that end close to .001, .201, .401, .601, and .801 will result in the smallest number of (fractional) shares sold. However, it could cost as much as $428/£324 to add additional fractional shares to get to .0, .2, .4, .6 and .8 or just above.

Appreciate that @Martin! :beers:

My dilemma now is do I increase my 0.5 holding when I got in a cracking price, or just reap the partial benefits after the split? :thinking::man_shrugging:

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